Tag Archives: National Skills Development Strategy

W Cape creates R5.8m training and development program for artisans

Western Cape logo

 

Western Cape government takes on the challenge of tackling the skills shortages in the region with the launch of an artisan development programme in the province. The objective of the programme is to up skill and train local workers and provide employment opportunities for young individuals.

The programme is a collaboration between the private sector, communities, Skills Education Training Authorities (SETAs) and Further Education and Training (FET) colleges. R5.8-million has been set aside to promote and train artisans in the region.

Minister Alan Winde, the Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister, commented that the scarcity and lack of artisans in the region could have a devastating effect and impact on the local economy moving forward given the critical importance of these type of skills when it comes to service delivery especially within the engineering sector.

 

Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister Alan Winde
Western Cape Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Minister Alan Winde

 

The goal and objective of the programme is to educate and train individuals with the necessary skills and in turn create and ongoing supply of qualified and skilled artisan who in turn can obtain employment and play an important role in advancing and growing of emerging sectors such as oil and gas industry.

The initial stage of the program will provide the necessary funding and support for 200 young individuals to complete their training and prepare them to take the National Trade Test exams.  The programme will also focus on training teachers and coaches within the 72 companies who have opted to join the programme  and assist them to train the young candidates whilst they are interning in these companies.

The programme is also aligned and works in parallel with the government’s National Development Plan which recognizes the importance of artisanship which can provide “shock absorbers for extreme poverty and platforms for self-employment” within developing economies and countries.

According to recent statements and comments from the National Development Plan, South Africa will need to produce at least 30000 artisan annually and the Western Cape government  want to play its part in helping the National Development Plan achieve its national objectives and goals.

Source: SouthAfrica.info

Review Details Advancement in South Africa Adult Education

South African Government reveals that substantial improvement has been made to remodel the country’s adult education system with recent data exhibiting enrollment figures reaching 233 000 this past year.

Collins Chabange, the Minister in the Presidency in charge of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation, expresses in the The Mid Term Review report  the fact that the Department of Higher Education and Training had improved access to higher education programmes by way of increasing spaces and available options at FET colleges and universities.

The report reviews and offers feedback to government with reference to the commitments government undertook at the outset of the last electoral term. Part of the report states that “This is an important milestone for increasing the employability of those without matric,”. The report was published at the same time as the green paper on higher education on higher education was released by Higher Education and Training Minister Blade Nzimande which forecasts in excess of 4.5 million students a year signing up at universities, colleges and other post-school institutions throughout the country by 2030.

The shift is an important part of the department’s endeavor to shift student focus from conventional institutions including universities to Further Education and Training (FET) colleges. The Mid Term Review report illustrates specific information and facts  of the successful efforts over the past year by government  to develop a high-quality FET program to offer adult learners the opportunity to obtain the essential skills which could assist them to partake in the country’s economic growth.

It discloses that a total of 30 117 out of work students entered into learnerships against a target of 17 531 for 2011. The objective for workers getting into learnerships was surpassed, with 19 192 workers entering learnerships against the target of 13 243. In excess of 11 000 learners joined the artisan training system with 8 102 being successful in their trade tests and acquiring their trade certificates. The pass rate for the trade test improved from 41% in 2010 to 57% in 2011.

The report emphasizes the creation of the National Certificate Vocational (NCV) system in 2011 furthermore marked an important milestone in establishing alternative strategies for skills development.

It contributed to the creation of options available for 164 713 additional learners at FET colleges. This was coupled with a variety of activities to boost the caliber of service offered by FET colleges, including an evaluation of curricula, syndication of learner and teaching support materials in addition to training of lecturers.

“During the remainder of the term, there is a need for the department to evaluate whether these activities have been effective and whether the FET pass rate meets the 2011 target of 43% for level 4, as opposed to the 39% achieved in 2010. It is also important for DHET to evaluate the quality of the FET qualification and its demand in the workplace. To reduce the non-completion of qualifications and to increase the pass rate, concerted efforts are needed to support underprepared learners in language, mathematics and science,”.

Having said that, it had not been identified whether or not the industry is able to absorb the elevated numbers of students graduating from FET colleges.

Government bodies are pinning their hopes on the  National Skills Accord involving government, business and labour accompanied by a commitment from the private sector and business to absorb FET graduates.

To make sure that graduates obtain the required skills essential to business, the government will have to intensify its initiatives to boost the quality of service furnished by the FET colleges.

This will include things like enhancing the technical and pedagogical qualifications of lecturers, raising prerequisites for practical experience for lecturers, in addition to making improvements to the governance and management of FET colleges.

Without these kinds of expansion plans, it would appear that the FET sector will continue to be hindered by the quality of its product.

To download and read full report – click here

South Africa skills development plan given a boost

Higher Education and Training Minister Blade Nzimande

A task team is going to be established to help to increase SETA’s capacity in order to fulfill the desired goals and objectives of the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) III.

NSDS III, unveiled last week by Higher Education and Training Minister Blade Nzimande, is the major driving force associated with the strategy to enhance the overall performance as well as effectiveness of the skills development program.

The plan of action, that will actually come into effect on 1 April 2011, symbolizes a commitment and responsibility to promoting the linking of skills development to career paths, career development and offering sustainable job opportunities and in-work progression.


Nzimande said the strategy concentrated specifically on individuals who do not possess appropriate technical skills or a sufficient amount of reading, writing and numeracy abilities to make it possible for them gain access to employment.

“Language, literacy and numeracy skills are unquestionably essential to improved economic and social participation, productivity and social inclusion,” Nzimande said.

The NSDS III places emphasis on eight goals and objectives, which includes more effective utilization of workplace based skills development in addition to encouraging and supporting cooperatives, small enterprises and local community education and training initiatives.


Nzimande reiterated that SETAs were definitely not destined to be shut down, on the contrary, preferably strengthened as a measure to rise above the difficulties, challenges and weakness within the system, through the NSDS.

Education Training and Development Practices SETA CEO, Sesi Nxesi, welcomed the launch of the NSDS III.

“All of us genuinely feel there exists a change in the country. It [NSDS III] is a lot more organised and structured, in addition it helps bring about cooperation and i am optimistic that we definitely will achieve the goals, collectively,” said an optimistic Nxesi.

Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (AgriSETA)
Banking SETA (BANKSETA)
Chemical Industries SETA (CHIETA)
Clothing, Textile, Footwear and Leather SETA (CTFL SETA)
Construction SETA(CETA)
Education Training and Skills Development SETA (ETSD-SETA)
Energy SETA (ESETA)
Finance, Accounting, Management Consulting and other Financial Services SETA (FASSET)
Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry SETA (FOODBEV)
Forest Industry SETA (FIETA)
Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA)
Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies SETA (isett seta)
Insurance SETA (INSETA)
Local Government SETA (LGSETA)
Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services (MERSETA)
Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing and Packaging SETA ( MAPPP-SETA)
Public Service Sector SETA (PSETA)
Safety and Security SETA (SASSETA)
Services SETA
SETA for Mining and Minerals Sector (MQA)
Social Security and Development SETA
Transport SETA (TETA)
Wholesale & Retail SETA (W&RSETA)

Source: BuaNews, gcis.gov.za