Tag Archives: matric

MEC Donald Grant launches website to assist matric pupils

Western Cape Education Department comes to the aid of matric students with the launch of a brand new website to help and assist matric students for the upcoming national senior certificate final exams. The new website is informative, engaging and entertaining. Some user have described the new website as not your average maths, science and geography lessons.

Education MEC of the Western Cape, Donald Grant,  launched the new website to support matric students with their studies and preparations for their final exams and is filled with lesson videos for  number of subjects, past papers for students to practice exam techniques and past questions, the upcoming exam timetable, as well as numerous tips, advise and suggestions to ensure that students succeed in the forthcoming finals exams.

Lessons in numerous subjects, although not all, have been uploaded via YouTube and as more lessons are completed in other key subjects, they will be uploaded. The lessons have been created and presented by experienced teachers to aid students in their preparations.

The Western Cape Educations Department formed an alliance with the University of Stellenbosch back in 2009 with the objective of broadcasting lessons in selected subjects to high schools via satellite. this year, for the very first time, lessons have been uploaded and can be view via YouTube.

 

Western Cape Education MEC Donald Grant
Western Cape Education MEC Donald Grant

Donald Grant stated that “Now the WCED is producing the videos by editing recordings from the telematics programmes. The department now has many hours of recordings available which are now been made available on YouTube. The WCED has posted over 180 recordings.”

Approximately 60 000 student have already registered for the 2013 matric exams which start on the 28th October. The Department of Education in the Western Cape estimated that that the vast majority of students writing this year matric exams will access the new website via their cellphones. Initially, the education department had planned to broadcast directly to high schools only towards the end of 2014 and be far more accessible for all pupils and teachers.

The website was designed and created to help the Class of 2013 and assist all students in their preparations for the national senior certificate. The launch of the new website now provides students with additional assistance, resources, and support for the upcoming exams.

The lessons and videos that have been uploaded also include discussions on previous exam papers and has focused on topics and questions which students have struggled with in previous years.

“The matric support site lists 11 topics for mathematics, ranging from equations and inequalities to trigonometry. The physics videos cover five topics, while chemistry covers four. The geography videos are classified under seven topics ranging from climate to map work and geographical information systems.

“Candidates can access the videos from drop-down lists that appear when they click on any of the topics. There are 79 videos on mathematics, 39 on physical science and 62 on geography.”

There is also a section on the website dealing with frequently asked questions. There are currently 57 FAQ’s covering six categories:

  • results
  • supplementary examinations
  • re-marking
  • certification
  • information for immigrants
  • teacher inquiries

There is also a section providing tips, advise and suggestions to assist students when it comes to time management, exam preparations, studying techniques, exam writing techniques, as well study guidelines for every matric subject.

MEC Grant encouraged all students to create and develop a personal study plan and to stick to their plans. He suggested to students to approach their teachers if they require assistance developing a study plan. He also suggested that all students access the new website and take advantage of the resources and tools available to them. Also, given that the September results are due to be released, it is a prefect time for students to focus on those areas and subject that they did not perform as well in and struggling.

To access the Matric Support Site,  CLICK HERE

More information is also available from the Western Cape Education Department’s website – http://wced.school.za/

Share

No Matric, No Problem!

Did you do matric in the past and never really got very good results? Did you maybe fail matric? Do you want to study further, but you think your matric certificate, or your matric fail is preventing you from further studies?

The Truth about Matric

Let me share with you some FACTS about Matric:

1.     Only 50% of students that start school ever gets to sit in a Matric class. Half of scholars leave school before they even get to the end of Matric.

2.     If you measure how many scholars passed Matric, by looking at how many should be in Matric, the failure rate for Matric is not 39.4%. The real failure rate is 79%

3.     Matric does not prepare you for any job. Employers employ people with real skills and real experience. If you have ever tried to get a job, you will know that very little of the interview is about Matric; and most of it is about your previous work experience.

4.     There are many courses you can study without first doing Matric.

So if you think you need Matric to be accepted for further studies… you are mistaken.

Some Background Figures

According to iol.co.za, “the Centre for Education Policy Development (CEPD) has shown that of the 1 550 790 pupils who entered the education system in 1998, only 551 940 made it to Grade 12 and wrote the final exam last year. This is a startling statistic that affects the official 60.6 percent pass rate’’.

“Of the 500 000 or so matrics who wrote the exam, 217 331 failed, representing a failure rate of 39.4 percent. But if the 998 850 pupils who got lost in the system during those 12 years were taken into account, the headline figures would change.”

The failure rate would double to 79 percent, the pass rate would shrink accordingly and the drop-out figure would stand at 64 percent, suggesting that it’s not six in 10 young people who are passing matric, as the Department of Basic Education’s figures show, but six in 10 young people who are getting no education at all!!! What does this say about our country’s school education system?”

FACT: nearly 8 out of 10 pupils that go to school either drop out, or, fail Matric.

So … Do you really need Grade 12?

If you want to go to a University and study for a Degree, you need to complete Grade 12. You need to pick the right subjects so that you can get a Matric with Exemption. And then you will also have to pass the University’s Entrance Exam.

If you want to study a College programme, short course or qualification, you must ask what the “entrance criteria” for that specific programme is. In some cases you need Grade 10, in some cases you need Grade 11 and in some cases you need Grade 12.

For some courses you need to have work experience, and for some you need to be over a certain age. And for some courses the requirement is that you have passed a course at NQF 3 (Grade 10) or 4 (Grade 12) level, but these do NOT have to be School Grades that you have passed!

This is all very confusing!

Yes it is! Please allow me to give you an easy way to figure out what to do next …..

Do you want to study for a Degree and go to a University?

YES – Complete your Grade 12 at school and make sure you have selected the correct subjects and that you comply with the University’s entrance criteria. Often they will require that your marks be at a certain level (for example: you must get an A for Maths). And most Universities will make you sit an entrance exam with the university, which you must pass before they will accept your applications.

NO – you have many, many options… keep reading!

 

Have you passed Grade 12?

YES – You can start most programmes that are at NQF 4 level. From this you can advance to NQF 5 level.

If you choose to do a programme that is not aligned to the NQF, you should still ask at what academic level the programme is. This will help you make sure that you will be able to master the academic content of the programme.

NO – keep reading. Next we shall show you some options open to people who do not have Grade 12.

 

Have you passed Grade 10 or 11?

YES – You can start any programme that is at NQF 3 level. From this you can advance to NQF 4 and sometimes NQF 5 level programmes. A programme at NQF level 4 is at the same academic level as Grade 12.If you choose to do a programme that is not aligned to the NQF, you should still ask at what academic level the programme is. This will help you make sure that you will be able to master the academic content of the programme. College SA has many courses that you can study if you have passed Grade 10 or Grade 11.

NO – keep reading. Next we shall show you some other options that might work for you.

 

Are you older than 23 years of age?

YES – Many training institutions will accept you on a course once you are older than 23. What you should check is that you will be able to handle the level of the language used in the course, and that you will be able to cope with the academic content of the course. If you feel unsure, it is always better to start with an NQF level 3 course and then work your way up from there.

NO – keep reading. Next we shall show you some options that might work for you.

Have you got work experience that is relevant to your studies?

YES – Most colleges will recognise your work experience. So if you have two or more years of work experience that is relevant to the area you want to study, then chances are that you will be accepted onto the programme based on your work experience.

What you should check is that you will be able to handle the level of the language used in the course, and that you will be able to cope with the academic content of the course. If you feel unsure, it is always better to start with an NQF level 3 course and then work your way up from there.

All courses have their own entrance criteria. And you will have to check the entrance criteria of any course you are interested in. For example, for some courses you need Grade 10, plus access to a Computer, and for other courses the only entrance criteria is that you must be older than 23 years of age, and able to understand the English used in the course material.

So you have many options, even if you don’t have matric?

Exactly! And to make it even easier, I shall now give you links to some of the courses at College SA, which you can do if:

  • you are older than 23, OR
  • if you have Grade 10, OR
  • if you have more than two year’s work experience

View College SA Profile and Courses

Share

Education levels among SA adults increase

Education levels among South African adults have significantly increased in the past ten years, the South African Institute of Race Relations (SAIRR) said on Tuesday.

“Between 1997 and 2007 the number of adults who had completed Grade Eight increased from 14,093,000 to 19,026,000,” it said in a statement.

The proportion of adults who had completed Grade Eight increased from 61.4 percent in 1997 to 69 percent in 2007, according to the SAIRR’s South African survey published this week.

The number of people who completed Grade 12 also increased.

“In 1997, some 5,398,000 people had completed matric. In 2007, this number had increased by just over three million to 9,020,000,” said SAIRR.

In 1997, the proportion of people with matric was 25.9 percent. In 2007, this was 32.7 percent.

SAIRR said a similar trend emerged when looking at the number of the people who had completed higher education.

In 1997, only 600,000 South Africans had completed some form of higher education. By 2007, this number had almost doubled to 1,050,000.

The number of people who had no schooling declined over the same period.

In 1997, there were 3,196,000 South Africans with no schooling, but 2,542,000 in 2007.

Researcher Marius Roodt said the increase in the number of people with an education was an achievement of which the government could be proud.

“However, there is still a large proportion of the population who do not have any schooling,” he said.

The challenge was to ensure that people who got an education, receive one that was of value, to allow them to find gainful employment and to contribute to the South African society.

Source: buanews.gov.za

Share