Tag Archives: Marketing

30% discount for Ashridge Executive Masters in Management

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This is a practical qualification that will provide you with deeper understanding of the management practices of leadership, strategy, marketing, finance, technology and innovation, team and change management. The qualification is offered by Ashridge Business School (UK) and is delivered 100% online via a robust learning zone, an online virtual environment packed with learning material from thought leaders, business books, articles, case studies and webinars. It is built around a series of assignments which are related to the participants’ own organisation, delivering immediate benefits to the individual and their organisation.

Target groups: management teams, managerial talent, senior managers & executives

Registrations: The 2013 registrations are already open and ongoing throughout the year. Register now and be eligible for over 30% corporate discounts on your fees. Management teams or other related group registrations also get favourable executive education packages.

For more details to assist in your decision making, kindly email us on consultants@peoplecapabilities.com and we will send you the Executive Masters in Management (eMiM) brochure and the application pack.

The Business School: Established in 1959, Ashridge is one of the world’s leading business schools, with an international reputation for top quality executive education and management development. Activities include open and customised executive education programmes, qualifcation programmes, organisation consulting, virtual learning and applied research. Its approach is practical and results-driven, underpinned by insight and internationally-renowned research based firmly in the real world.

 

To view other courses offered by People Capabilities – Click here

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Coca-Cola Retains Title as World’s Most Valuable Brand

 

Bloomberg unveiled Interbrand’s Best Global Brands of 2011 report. The rankings are derived from five criteria and don’t include privately owned brands. The current recession has provided marketing executives throughout the world with the most challenging test of their careers. A number of brands have excelled amid the difficult times-or at the very least held their own. While others have fallen an unexpected number of spots in the latest report compiled by consultancy Interbrand. However, for seven brands, remarkable performances saw them race up the charts to take their place on this year’s list.

The majority of the top 10 have retained their positions from last year. Coca-Cola retains the #1 spot, followed by IBM, Microsoft, Google, and GE. Despite the fact that there aren’t a great deal of differences on this year’s list, you will discover a couple of unexpected surprises. Nissan, John Deere, and HTC are new on this year’s list, ranking at 90, 97, and 98, respectively.

 

Out of all the brands listed, Apple experienced the most significant growth and second biggest jump in the rankings. In a year when the majority of brands moved no more than a few spots in either direction, Apple leaped amazingly nine places becoming the eighth most valuable brand globally. With an amazing 58% improvement in brand value, Apple leaped from 17th place last year to break into this year’s top 10.

Amazon too experienced incredible growth, jumping 10 spots to come in at No.26 on the list, having a year-over-year value increase of 32%. Microsoft and Google finished in third and fourth respectively, with Microsoft slipping 3% and Google increasing 27% as compared to 2010.

Apple’s tremendous increase is extraordinary, but not all that unexpected, considering the year the company has experienced. What is going to be interesting is to see where Apple is ranked the same time next year, taking into consideration the adjustments to the company at the end of 2011.

To view interactive table ranking of the top global brands –  click here

Source: Interbrand.com

Lodging Managers

Significant Points

* Long hours, including night and weekend work, are common.
* Employment is projected to grow more slowly than the average for all occupations.
* College graduates with degrees in hotel or hospitality management should have better opportunities for jobs at full-service hotels and for advancement than those without a degree.

Nature of the Work

A comfortable room, good food, and a helpful staff can make being away from home an enjoyable experience for both vacationing families and business travelers. Lodging managers make sure that these conveniences are provided, while also ensuring that the establishments are run efficiently and profitably. Most lodging managers work in traditional hotels and motels, but some work in other lodging establishments, such as recreational camps and RV parks, inns, boardinghouses, and youth hostels.


Lodging establishments can vary significantly in size and in the number of services they provide, which can range from supplying a simple in-room television and a continental breakfast to operating a casino and accommodating conventions. These factors affect the number and type of lodging managers employed at each property.

The one person who oversees all lodging operations at a property is usually called a general manager. At larger hotels with several departments and multiple layers of management, the general manager and multiple assistant managers coordinate the activities of separate departments.  In smaller limited-service hotels—mainly those without food and beverage service—one lodging manager may direct all the activities of the property.


Lodging managers have overall responsibility for the operation and profitability of the hotel. Depending on the hotel and the size of its staff, lodging managers may either perform or direct housekeeping, personnel, office administration, marketing and sales, purchasing, security, maintenance, oversight of recreation facilities, and other activities. They may hire and train staff, set schedules, and lend a hand when needed.


Within guidelines established by the owners of the hotel or executives of the hotel chain, lodging managers set room rates, allocate funds to departments, approve expenditures, and ensure that standards for guest service, decor, housekeeping, food quality, and banquet operations are met. Increasingly, lodging managers also are responsible for ensuring that the information technology common in today’s hotels is operational. Some lodging managers, often called revenue managers, work in financial management, monitoring room sales and reservations, overseeing accounting and cash-flow matters at the hotel, projecting occupancy levels, and deciding which rooms to discount and when to offer rate specials.


Front office managers, a category of lodging manager, coordinate reservations and room assignments and train and direct the hotel’s front desk staff. They ensure that guests are treated courteously, complaints and problems are resolved, and requests for special services are carried out. At some hotels, they may greet the guests personally and provide them individual attention to see their needs are met. Any adjustments to bills often are referred to front office managers for resolution.


Convention services managers coordinate the activities of various departments to accommodate meetings, conventions, and special events. They meet with representatives of groups or organizations to plan the number of conference rooms to reserve, the configuration of the meeting space, and determine what other services the group will need, such as catering or banquets and audio, visual, or other electronic requirements. During the meeting or event, they resolve unexpected problems and monitor activities to ensure that hotel operations conform to the group’s expectations.


Lodging managers may work with hotel sales and marketing directors and public relations directors to manage and coordinate the advertising and promotion of the hotel. They help develop lodging and dining specials and coordinate special events, such as holiday or seasonal specials. They may direct their staff to purchase advertising and to market their property to organizations or groups seeking a venue for conferences, conventions, business meetings, trade shows, and special events.


Lodging managers who oversee the personnel functions of a hotel or serve as human resource directors ensure that all accounting, payroll, and employee relations matters are handled in compliance with hotel policy and applicable laws. They also oversee hiring practices and standards and ensure that training and promotion programs reflect appropriate employee development guidelines.


Computers are used extensively by lodging managers and their assistants to keep track of guests’ bills, reservations, room assignments, meetings, and special events. In addition, computers are used to order food, beverages, and supplies, as well as to prepare reports for hotel owners and top-level managers. Many hotels also provide extensive information technology services for their guests. Managers work with computer specialists and other information technology specialists to ensure that the hotel’s computer systems, Internet, and communications networks function properly.

Work environment.

Because hotels are open around the clock, night and weekend work is common. Many lodging managers work more than 40 hours per week and are often on-call, which means they may be called back to work at any time. In some hotels and resort properties where work is seasonal, managers may have other duties less related to guest services during the off season or they may find work in other hotels or occupations.

The pressures of coordinating a wide range of activities, turning a profit for investors, and dealing with guests who sometimes are angry can be stressful. Managing conferences and working at the front desk during check-in and check-out times can be particularly hectic.

Source: bls.gov, cnn.com, education.com, sjsu.edu, seattleschools.com, rateglobe.com

Advertising, Marketing, Promotions, Public Relations, and Sales Managers

Significant Points

  • Keen competition is expected for these highly coveted jobs.
  • College graduates with related experience, a high level of creativity, strong communication skills, and computer skills should have the best job opportunities.
  • High earnings, substantial travel, and long hours, including evenings and weekends, are common.
  • Because of the importance and high visibility of their jobs, these managers often are prime candidates for advancement to the highest ranks.

Nature of the Work

Advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers coordinate their companies’ market research, marketing strategy, sales, advertising, promotion, pricing, product development, and public relations activities. In small firms, the owner or chief executive officer might assume all advertising, promotions, marketing, sales, and public relations responsibilities. In large firms, which may offer numerous products and services nationally or even worldwide, an executive vice president directs overall advertising, marketing, promotions, sales, and public relations policies.
Advertising managers. Advertising managers oversee advertising and promotion staffs, which usually are small, except in the largest firms. In a small firm, managers may serve as liaisons between the firm and the advertising or promotion agency to which many advertising or promotional functions are contracted out. In larger firms, advertising managers oversee in-house account, creative, and media services departments. The account executive manages the account services department, assesses the need for advertising and, in advertising agencies, maintains the accounts of clients.

The creative services department develops the subject matter and presentation of advertising. The creative director oversees the copy chief, art director, and associated staff. The media director oversees planning groups that select the communication media—for example, radio, television, newspapers, magazines, the Internet, or outdoor signs—to disseminate the advertising.

Marketing managers. Marketing managers develop the firm’s marketing strategy in detail. With the help of subordinates, including product development managers and market research managers, they estimate the demand for products and services offered by the firm and its competitors. In addition, they identify potential markets—for example, business firms, wholesalers, retailers, government, or the general public.

Marketing managers develop pricing strategy to help firms maximize profits and market share while ensuring that the firm’s customers are satisfied. In collaboration with sales, product development, and other managers, they monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services, and they oversee product development. Marketing managers work with advertising and promotion managers to promote the firm’s products and services and to attract potential users.

Promotions managers. Promotions managers supervise staffs of promotions specialists. These managers direct promotions programs that combine advertising with purchase incentives to increase sales. In an effort to establish closer contact with purchasers—dealers, distributors, or consumers—promotions programs may use direct mail, telemarketing, television or radio advertising, catalogs, exhibits, inserts in newspapers, Internet advertisements or Web sites, in-store displays or product endorsements, and special events. Purchasing incentives may include discounts, samples, gifts, rebates, coupons, sweepstakes, and contests.

Public relations managers. Public relations managers supervise public relations specialists. (See the Handbook statement on public relations specialists.) These managers direct publicity programs to a targeted audience. They often specialize in a specific area, such as crisis management, or in a specific industry, such as health care. They use every available communication medium to maintain the support of the specific group upon whom their organization’s success depends, such as consumers, stockholders, or the general public. For example, public relations managers may clarify or justify the firm’s point of view on health or environmental issues to community or special-interest groups.

Public relations managers also evaluate advertising and promotions programs for compatibility with public relations efforts and serve as the eyes and ears of top management. They observe social, economic, and political trends that might ultimately affect the firm, and they make recommendations to enhance the firm’s image on the basis of those trends.
Public relations managers may confer with labor relations managers to produce internal company communications—such as newsletters about employee-management relations—and with financial managers to produce company reports. They assist company executives in drafting speeches, arranging interviews, and maintaining other forms of public contact; oversee company archives; and respond to requests for information. In addition, some of these managers handle special events, such as the sponsorship of races, parties introducing new products, or other activities that the firm supports in order to gain public attention through the press without advertising directly.

Sales managers. Sales managers direct the firm’s sales program. They assign sales territories, set goals, and establish training programs for the sales representatives. (See the Handbook statement on sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing). Sales managers advise the sales representatives on ways to improve their sales performance. In large, multi-product firms, they oversee regional and local sales managers and their staffs. Sales managers maintain contact with dealers and distributors. They analyze sales statistics gathered by their staffs to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and to monitor customers’ preferences. Such information is vital in the development of products and the maximization of profits.

Work environment

Advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers work in offices close to those of top managers. Working under pressure is unavoidable when schedules change and problems arise, but deadlines and goals must still be met.

Substantial travel may be involved. For example, attendance at meetings sponsored by associations or industries often is mandatory. Sales managers travel to national, regional, and local offices and to the offices of various dealers and distributors. Advertising and promotions managers may travel to meet with clients or representatives of communications media. At times, public relations managers travel to meet with special-interest groups or government officials. Job transfers between headquarters and regional offices are common, particularly among sales managers.

Long hours, including evenings and weekends are common. In 2006, about two-thirds of advertising, marketing, and public relations managers worked more than 40 hours a week.

Source: bls.gov