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Is there such a thing as a high-paying, low-stress job?

Low Stress Jobs

Think there’s no such thing as a high-paying, low-stress job? Think again. It turns out there are plenty of low-stress professions in which you can pull in a pretty penny.  Research undertaken by Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., a career-information expert, compared average salaries and stress levels of the 767 occupations to identify jobs with that perfect combination of high pay and low stress.

The stress tolerance for each job is a rating on a scale from zero to 100, where a lower rating signals less stress. It measures how frequently workers must accept criticism and deal effectively with high stress on the job.

Here is the list:

Orthodontists – Stress tolerance: 67.0 with an average annual salary: $196,270

What they do: Examine, diagnose, and treat dental malocclusions and oral cavity anomalies. Design and fabricate appliances to realign teeth and jaws to produce and maintain normal function and to improve appearance.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree, four-year dental school, and one to two years of residency training

Marine Engineers and Naval Architects – Stress tolerance: 67.0 with an average annual salary: $94,040

What they do: Design, build, and maintain ships, including aircraft carriers, submarines, sailboats, and tankers. Marine engineers work on the mechanical systems, such as propulsion and steering. Naval architects work on the basic design, including the form and stability of hulls.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree (practical experience is also highly valued)

Computer Hardware Engineers – Stress tolerance: 67.0 with an average annual salary: $106,930

What they do: Research, design, develop, or test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree from an accredited program

Food Scientists – Stress tolerance: 55.8 with average annual salary: $65,340

What they do: Ensure that agricultural establishments are productive and food is safe.

Education requirements: At least a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited post secondary institution; many get a doctoral degree

Astronomers – Stress tolerance: 62.0 with an average annual salary: $110,440

What they do: Observe, research, and interpret astronomical phenomena to increase basic knowledge or apply such information to practical problems.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree, but most astronomers go on to get a master’s and Ph.D.

Economists – Stress tolerance: 63.3 with an average annual salary: $101,450

What they do: Economists study the production and distribution of resources, goods, and services.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree

Political Scientists – Stress tolerance: 60.8 with an average annual salary: $100,900

What they do: Political scientists study the origin, development, and analyze the structure and operation of political systems and trends.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree, followed by master’s or Ph.D in political science, public administration, or a related field.

Mathematicians – Stress tolerance: 57.3 with an Average annual salary: $103,310

What they do: Conduct research in fundamental mathematics or in application of mathematical techniques to science, management, and other fields. Solve problems in various fields using mathematical methods.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s or master’s degree for those who want to work in government, and a doctorate may be required to work for private companies.

Law Teachers – Stress tolerance: 62.8 with an average annual salary: $122,280

What they do: Teach courses in law.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s and law degrees.

Actuaries – Stress tolerance: 63.8 with an average annual salary: $107,740

What they do: Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree and a series of exams to become certified.

Physicists – Stress tolerance: 61.3 with an average annual salary: $117,040

What they do: Conduct research into physical phenomena, develop theories on the basis of observation and experiments, and devise methods to apply physical laws and theories.

Education requirements: Ph.D. for most research jobs.

Optometrists – Stress tolerance: 70.3 with an average annual salary: $111,640

What they do: Optometrists perform eye exams to check for vision problems and diseases. They prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses as needed.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s, four-year doctor of optometry program, and a state license.

Computer and Information Systems Managers – Stress tolerance: 64.3 with an average annual salary: $132,570

What they do: These workers help determine the information technology goals of an organization and are responsible for implementing the appropriate computer systems to meet those goals.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree.

Art Directors – Stress tolerance: 69.0 with an average annual salary: $96,650

What they do: Art directors are responsible for the visual style and images in magazines, newspapers, product packaging, and movie and television productions.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree or previous work experience.

Statisticians – Stress tolerance: 64.0 with an average annual salary: $83,310

What they do: Use statistical methods to collect and analyze data and help solve real-world problems in business, engineering, the sciences, or other fields.

Education requirements: Typically need a graduate degree.

Geoscientists (Except Hydrologists and Geographers) – Stress tolerance: 62.5 with an average annual salary: $108,420

What they do: Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth.

Education requirements: At least a Bachelor’s degree (in several states, geoscientists may need a license).

Applications Software Developers – Stress tolerance: 65.0 with an average annual salary: $96,260

What they do: Develop, create, and modify general computer applications software or specialized utility programs.

Education requirements: Bachelor’s degree and strong computer programming skills.

Note: Stress tolerance is measured by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Information Network, with lower scores indicating less stress on the job.

Source: businessinsider.com

The Best Jobs For 2014

Best and Worst jobs

 

CareerCast, a global job-search portal, has released their list of the worst jobs for 2014. CareerCast offers career advise and information about salaries offered by different companies in different industries.

To arrive at its conclusions, its researchers utilize a method which takes into consideration income and growth potential within an industry, together with a variety of guidelines such as the level of competitiveness plus the degree of public contact, physical expectations such as crawling, stooping and bending in addition to work conditions like toxic fumes and noise. Furthermore, they examine stressors such as level of travel required by the job, deadlines, in addition to physical risks including whether or not the workers’ or their colleagues’ life is put at risk on the job.

Read on for the list of “best” jobs, which get the lowest rating. Here is the list of the worst jobs for 2014.
1. Mathematician
2. Tenured University Professor
3. Statistician
4. Actuary
5. Audiologist
6. Dental Hygienist
7. Software Engineer
8. Computer Systems Analyst
9. Occupational Therapist
10. Speech Pathologist

Source: Forbes.com

 

 

The Worst Jobs For 2014

Best and Worst jobs

CareerCast, a global job-search portal, has released their list of the worst jobs for 2014. CareerCast offers career advise and information about salaries offered by different companies in different industries. To arrive at its conclusions, its researchers utilize a method which takes into consideration income and growth potential within an industry, together with a variety of guidelines such as the level of competitiveness plus the degree of public contact, physical expectations such as crawling, stooping and bending in addition to work conditions like toxic fumes and noise. Furthermore, they examine stressors such as level of travel required by the job, deadlines, in addition to physical risks including whether or not the workers’ or their colleagues’ life is put at risk on the job. Read on for the list of “worst” jobs, which get the lowest rating. Here is the list of the worst jobs for 2014.

1. Lumberjack
2. Newspaper Reporter
3. Enlisted Military Personnel
4. Taxi Driver
5. Broadcaster
6. Head Cook
7. Flight Attendant
8. Garbage Collector
9. Firefighter
10. Corrections Officer

Source: Forbes.com

 

Western Cape Education Department launches online recruitment system for teachers

 

The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) has launched a brand new online system offering teachers a much simpler and easier solution to do a search for teaching positions in the province and make application for jobs.

The e-Recruitment System is a spin-off from an online application system which had been piloted in 2011 for the filling of promotion posts. The brand new system was created and fine-tuned as a result of analysis and findings of the pilot.

Department spokesperson Bronagh Casey explained that the purpose of the e-Recruitment system is to recruit the best teachers as well as to minimize the stress and paperwork associated with making an application for a teaching post.

Showcasing some great benefits of the new system, Casey explained that the e-Recruitment System makes it possible for teachers to capture and store their CVs online. Additionally, they are capable of editing and updating their CVs via the online network.

Teachers are going to have the ability to submit an application for a specific job post online as well as link their latest CVs with their application. The system will instantaneously generate a letter acknowledging receipt of an application for a post. On top of that, applicants will not have to make copies of records and documents for each application they submit. Furthermore, they will not be forced to pay postage costs or stand in queues to submit applications prior to closing dates. The system will allocate a unique identification number to every teacher profile on the network.

The department is encouraging all teachers to begin the process of compiling their CVs on the e-Recruitment System from 1 December 2012. Applications will be able to be submitted online from 1 January 2013.

Casey pointed out the fact that the new system demonstrated the on-going innovation by the department as it sought to enhance the manner in which it recruited and employed staff.

Earlier successes included boosting the number of vacancy lists provided by the department to no less than five a year, as opposed to twice a year prior to 2010.

Technology and innovation has assisted the education department to accomplish a substantially speedier turnaround time for permanent appointments, and at the same time avoid unnecessary utilization of contract staff. In the past, the department was forced to wait, on average, six months or more to fill a post permanently. In addition, the department furthermore reduced the turnaround times for the filling of principal posts from at least six months to three months on average. Every one of these actions has assisted to considerably stabilize the entire system.

The brand new e-Recruitment System has made it simpler for the department to optimize their paper based systems and made it simpler for the department to manage the entire recruitment process and numbers involved. This is a huge leap forward for the education department and teacher alike.

To look for a job or post your CV today on the brand new e-Recruitment System – CLICK HERE

Source: SAnews.gov.za

Top Ten Ways to Find a Job

When the economy is in bad shape, the job market is usually worse. Those with jobs are trying to stay employed and people without jobs are desperately trying to find a new job, both can be extremely stressful.

If you put in the time and effort into finding a new job you will be rewarded no matter how fierce the competition is. Stay motivated and persistent – finding a new job is your new job right now.

These are the top ten ways to find a new job:

1. Use the Internet Daily – It is so easy to get lost on the Internet wasting time on websites, job boards and social media sites with no real benefits. Make sure you are actively spending your time on the Internet looking for and applying to jobs and networking with those who may be able to help. There are a ton of useful job boards and career sites to help you focus your search. Check out JobBoardReviews.com to help find the most useful websites to your industry or profession. Do your best to stay focused on your job search for a few hours a day. Be sure to actively apply to jobs, don’t just upload your resume and wait for phone calls.

2. Perfect your resume – Your resume is often the first glimpse a potential employer gets of you and your skills, make sure it accurately details your skills and work history and how they can benefit your future employer. Make sure you have someone proof read it before sending it out and try to customize it for each job you are applying for.

3. Network – Let everyone you know that you are looking for a job. The more people you have out there on your team, with eyes open the more opportunities you will have. Tell everyone in your network what kind of a job you are looking for or any special skills you may have. You can forward your resume to people in your network and ask them if they know of anyone hiring or if they can check within their company for any open positions. Most people actually find and are hired through referrals from a friend or family member than any other source.

4. Go back to school – Now is the time to get the competitive edge over other job candidates. Many people are finding it hard to get to a traditional college or university and are opting for online schools and programs. Look into enrolling in an accredited online college for some online courses and upgrading your training. Increasing your education will improve your resume and get you one step closer to landing a job.

5. Target Local Companies – Get out and start knocking on some doors. If you are not having any luck online submitting your resume online, it’s time to get out and start meeting people face to face. Make a list of companies in your area that you would like to work for, call them directly to see if they have any openings that interest you. If that doesn’t work, put on some professional attire and stop by with your resume in hand.

6. Industry Mags and Social Niches – Sometimes the best positions that are the perfect fit are only being advertised in industry specific magazines and publications. Sign up for some Industry trade magazines, online groups, forums, and social networks. Reading up on the latest industry news is a great way to stay on top and find new open positions. It also will help with your industry specific networking.

7. Job Fairs – Can it get better than this. Job fairs are a giant room or convention center filled with companies who are looking to hire. Dress to impress, print out a bunch of copies on your resume and start talking to companies who are looking to hire. It’s such an easy way to meet people and get some help with your search

8. Get some Professional Help – Recruiters, headhunters, and temp agencies are always looking for qualified candidates. Find some recruiters that specialize in your industry or position and get them your resume.

9. State and public resources – There are so many free resources offered by your state to help job seekers find a new job. Most states and counties offer everything from resume writing services, career counseling, and lots of sessions on all the skills you will need to find you new job. State and local resources are also often given lists of openings that aren’t posted or found in other locations. Pop on over and see what they can offer.

10. Consider Freelancing – If you are not finding the right full time position, consider taking a contract position or freelancing your services out. Many companies are not able to hire for full time positions but would be willing to give you a try on an as need basis.

Get on out there! Remember to Network, keep your head up and Don’t give up! There is someone out there waiting to hire you.

Source: Jill Czeczuga