Tag Archives: business

What does it take to be an Executive

Book being read

Executives have three core responsibilities: Develop the business, grow talent, and make decisions that drive innovation.

Effective leaders build organisations where customers want to do business and people can do their best work. Leadership doesn’t necessarily come with a title or a status, but the title comes with responsibility and accountability. Leadership requires the ability to take your people to places they wouldn’t have gone if you hadn’t been in the picture. An executive needs to be fairly well rounded in a wide range of competencies.

Team building – An important skill for any executive is getting a management team and varied functional areas working together. The executive’s responsibility is to manage teams within the business in such a way that departments and individuals work together to fulfill the organisation’s vision.

Strategic thinking – Executives need to have an understanding of the organisation, a vision of where to take the organisation, and the ability to put together a workable plan to get from here to there.

Communication skills – This is more than being able to articulate the company’s values and vision. Executives need to have interpersonal communication skills that will help align people and make sure that there is communication throughout the organisation. Executives should be able to communicate job requirements and roles at a very simple level and ensure employees understand how these jobs contribute to the overall success of the business.

Motivational skills – This is a complex competency which requires a different approach for different people. Motivation requires interpersonal awareness, the ability to identify an individual’s wants and needs, and to respond to them appropriately.

Mentoring and coaching skills – This skill goes beyond being a mentor, but needs to have the focus on how to optimise people. Most executives recognise that employees are their most valuable assets, but many don’t put their money where their mouths are. Developing employees includes training, feedback processes, thinking about people in terms of strengths and weaknesses, and their key developmental points. An executive has to be willing and able, to bring people along and help them grow with the organisation.

 

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The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law with Albie Sachs

The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law with Albie Sachs

Transcend – Broad-Based BEE training, B-BBEE Scorecard Software and B-BBEE consulting services invites you to join Ex Justice Albie Sachs (Guest Speaker) at Constitutional Hill – 29th of September 2010

Former Constitutional Court Justice and Winner of the Sunday Times Literary Award for his book

“The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law”

Do you really understand South Africa today, or is the focus on the Broad-Based BEE scorecard rather than on sustainable transformation? We as Transcend, in our decade of transformation experience, have come to realize that people change – not through intellectual debate and information alone – but rather through an emotional catalyst to frame the change.

Our Immersion Experience is designed to provide this context of personal insight.

To achieve this unique perspective, we are offering you the chance to join us on an Immersion experience that will provide you with an overview of the past, present and future socio-political and business context of South Africa

Albie Sachs

About Albie Sachs

During the 1980s working closely with Oliver Tambo, leader of the ANC in exile, he helped draft the organisation’s Code of Conduct, as well as its statutes. After recovering from the bomb he devoted himself full-time to preparations for a new democratic Constitution for South Africa. In 1990 he returned home and as a member of the Constitutional Committee
and the National Executive of the ANC took an active part in the negotiations which led to South Africa becoming a constitutional democracy. After the first democratic election in 1994 he was appointed by President Nelson Mandela to serve on the newly established Constitutional Court.

The venue – Constitutional Hill

Constitutional Hill is the site of both our Constitutional Court and the old prison that held Nelson Mandela (Madiba) and Gandhi.
This environment acts as a palimpsest (a surface on which the original writing has been erased to make way for new writing, but upon which traces of the old writing remain visible).

This helps us to get the past and the present into some sensible framework.

Join our exciting new BBBEE Updater Membership and benefit from the following:

B-BBEE Updater membership –

•    Need your Broad-Based BEE Interpretive questions answered
•    Looking for a comprehensive BBBEE Toolkit
•    Need to stay up-to-date with the latest in BEE

To find out more about our BEE Updater membership email brian@transcend.co.za
INVESTMENT – EVENT ONLY – Guest Speaker Albie Sachs – 29th September 2010 – R750 (excl. VAT) per delegate
INVESTMENT – BEE Updater Membership, including the event with Albie Sachs on the 29th of September

Even if you can’t make the event on the 29th of September with Albie Sachs at Constitutional Hill Register for the full BEE Updater membership and join us at other exciting events like this. – R1950 (excl. VAT) per delegate

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SA needs to do business differently to succeed

If South Africa is to succeed in extracting maximum benefits from its mineral endowment it must do business differently, says Mineral and Resources Minister Susan Shabangu.

 

Minister of Mining Ms Susan Shabangu

 

“We cannot continue to mine and export ore and other raw materials for processing elsewhere, as this limit the benefits we can derive from the exploitation of our resources,” she said.

Speaking at the Africa Down Under Conference held in Australia on Wednesday, Shabangu said there was a need to increase value addition to minerals before they are exported, in line with government’s new industrialisation priorities.

 

 

“This will present enormous investment opportunities in the country for both South African and foreign investors. We, however, need to enlist the support of strategic international partners to facilitate skills and technology transfer for the benefit of local beneficiation,” the minister said.

Shabangu said the shortage of skilled human capital, particularly of mining engineers, technicians and inspectors, not only poses a major threat to the sustainable growth of the South African mining industry but also contributes to fatalities and injuries sustained in the industry.

“We have had to seriously examine our options in order to find effective solutions to deal with the challenge of skills shortage,” she said.

 

 

Among other things, the conference seeks to provide an excellent opportunity to strengthen commercial links in the sector.

Africa Down Under is one of the foremost international mining industry events focused on Africa.

Source: BuaNews, info.gov.za, mining.mines.edu

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SA business gets tech-savvy

Smartphones have made a dramatic entry into corporate South Africa, far surpassing general consumer use or small business use.

This is a surprise finding from a new research study released today by World Wide Worx. The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 report reveals that three-quarters of South African companies have deployed smartphones in their organisations, compared to almost none two years ago.

The study, backed by First National Bank and Research In Motion (RIM), shows thaSmartphones have made a dramatic entry into corporate South Africa, far surpassing general consumer use or small business use.

This is a surprise finding from a new research study released today by World Wide Worx. The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 report reveals that three-quarters of South African companies have deployed smartphones in their organisations, compared to almost none two years ago.

The study, backed by First National Bank and Research In Motion (RIM), shows that saturation point has almost been reached by large South African companies in the use of fixed landlines (96%) and ordinary cellphones (92%). And, as forecast in 2007, 3G data card penetration has also reached near saturation, with 94% of large companies deploying it. Now the focus has turned to integration of smartphones with business processes.

“These results show that enterprise mobility solutions are no longer just nice to have,” says Deon Liebenberg, RIM’s regional director for sub-Saharan Africa. “They’re essential for businesses that want to be competitive, responsive and efficient in a world where a customer won’t wait for a salesperson who is visiting customers and where project flow can’t stop because a manager is at a full-day meeting.

“Not only does mobility allow companies to improve internal efficiencies and communications, it also enables them to interact more effectively with their increasingly mobile customers.”

The study also showed that corporate South Africa expects to embrace the new world of online services to an extent that was not even anticipated as recently as one year ago.

“Until last year, concepts like software as a service (Saas) and cloud computing were regarded as little more than buzzwords,” says Arthur Goldstuck, MD of World Wide Worx.

Yet, in the next 24 months, 84% of South African corporations expect to have a Saas strategy in place, and 60% expect to have adopted a cloud computing strategy.

“These aren’t technologies as such,” says Goldstuck. “They are strategies that make the organisation’s use of new technology more efficient. From storage systems to software deployment, from hardware upgrades to network capacity to bandwidth, the focus is on cost-effectiveness, flexibility and mobility.”

Among the technologies expected to take off as a result of the Saas and cloud computing revolution are:

* Fixed-mobile convergence, with 72% of companies expecting to adopt systems that allow seamless connectivity between fixed and mobile networks.
* Virtualisation, with 65% expected to embrace this flexible and cost-effective approach to network and server technology.
* Outsourced storage and archiving systems, with half of large South African companies predicting they will be using it in the next 24 months.

The combined effect of these technologies is that, while the organisation’s buildings and infrastructure may still be confined to a specific site, its people, activities, information, documentation and data have been freed from location.

“We are literally seeing the foundations being laid for the company of the future,” says Goldstuck.

Liebenberg adds: “Smartphones are now mainstream devices within South African businesses, but the smartphone revolution has only just begun. Enterprises should now be looking at what smartphones mean for their businesses in a more strategic and holistic fashion. They need to work towards mobilising their core internal and customer-facing processes so that their employees can use ubiquitous connectivity to be productive and responsive wherever they are.”

The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 forms part of the Mobility 2009 project, which included research among 1 000 consumers, 1 000 small and medium enterprisese and 240 large enterprises in South Africa.

Source: mediaclubsouthafrica.com, mobilemarketingwatch.com, apple.com, nokia,com, blackberry.com saturation point has almost been reached by large South African companies in the use of fixed landlines (96%) and ordinary cellphones (92%). And, as forecast in 2007, 3G data card penetration has also reached near saturation, with 94% of large companies deploying it. Now the focus has turned to integration of smartphones with business processes.

“These results show that enterprise mobility solutions are no longer just nice to have,” says Deon Liebenberg, RIM’s regional director for sub-Saharan Africa. “They’re essential for businesses that want to be competitive, responsive and efficient in a world where a customer won’t wait for a salesperson who is visiting customers and where project flow can’t stop because a manager is at a full-day meeting.

“Not only does mobility allow companies to improve internal efficiencies and communications, it also enables them to interact more effectively with their increasingly mobile customers.”

The study also showed that corporate South Africa expects to embrace the new world of online services to an extent that was not even anticipated as recently as one year ago.

“Until last year, concepts like software as a service (Saas) and cloud computing were regarded as little more than buzzwords,” says Arthur Goldstuck, MD of World Wide Worx.

Yet, in the next 24 months, 84% of South African corporations expect to have a Saas strategy in place, and 60% expect to have adopted a cloud computing strategy.

“These aren’t technologies as such,” says Goldstuck. “They are strategies that make the organisation’s use of new technology more efficient. From storage systems to software deployment, from hardware upgrades to network capacity to bandwidth, the focus is on cost-effectiveness, flexibility and mobility.”

Among the technologies expected to take off as a result of the Saas and cloud computing revolution are:

* Fixed-mobile convergence, with 72% of companies expecting to adopt systems that allow seamless connectivity between fixed and mobile networks.
* Virtualisation, with 65% expected to embrace this flexible and cost-effective approach to network and server technology.
* Outsourced storage and archiving systems, with half of large South African companies predicting they will be using it in the next 24 months.

The combined effect of these technologies is that, while the organisation’s buildings and infrastructure may still be confined to a specific site, its people, activities, information, documentation and data have been freed from location.


“We are literally seeing the foundations being laid for the company of the future,” says Goldstuck.

Liebenberg adds: “Smartphones are now mainstream devices within South African businesses, but the smartphone revolution has only just begun. Enterprises should now be looking at what smartphones mean for their businesses in a more strategic and holistic fashion. They need to work towards mobilising their core internal and customer-facing processes so that their employees can use ubiquitous connectivity to be productive and responsive wherever they are.”

The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 forms part of the Mobility 2009 project, which included research among 1 000 consumers, 1 000 small and medium enterprisese and 240 large enterprises in South Africa.

Source: mediaclubsouthafrica.com, mobilemarketingwatch.com, apple.com, nokia,com, blackberry.com

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