Category Archives: Telecommunications

World Bank: African economy growing

Africa’s overall economy is without a doubt on the right track and may even come up with a quicker financial recovery from the recession when compared to the US. This is based on the World Bank’s Global Economic Prospects report for 2011.

The report, released in mid-January, forecasted that sub-Saharan Africa would most likely improve its gross domestic product (GDP) from 4.7% in 2010 to 5.3% for this year. That number might possibly be bumped upwards to 5.5% in 2012.

The report in particular mentioned that price levels in metals, minerals and oil, along with more significant investment in manufacturing and telecommunications companies, have definitely contributed towards the growth.


As indicated by Phumelele Mbiyo, Standard Bank’s Senior Africa Strategist for Global Market Research, the numbers suggest that economic activity, particularly in relation to mining and construction, is without a doubt growing in the region.

“The reason behind this type of increase is simply because prices for commodities are fairly high and they have enticed investment, in particular from emerging markets such as China,” he said.

Mbiyo is convinced an average person would most likely reap the benefits of these types of optimistic forecasts, as companies have the desire to seek the services of locals.


“There has already been increased employment of locals within the mining and construction industries. There is certainly destined to be a considerable amount of employment in future, primarily by European and American based companies who have invested heavily in mining in Africa.”

High continental growth

Having said that, the report pointed out the fact that the best growth rates were not necessarily to emerge from South Africa, the region’s traditional economic hub. Rather, the greatest figures originated from countries such as Nigeria, Angola, Kenya, the Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, and Tanzania.

South Africa has been projected at 3.5% for 2011 in contrast to other countries from the other countries in the region were believed to grow at an average of 6.4% for the same year.


Mbiyo outlined that this is simply not for the reason that South Africa’s growth is slowing down, but instead for the reason that other countries are beginning completely new industries now not to mention coming from a low base whereas South Africa had already established exactly the same industrial sectors years ago.

“Angola is set to grow by 7% on average whereas Ghana will average 13% over the following two years. Simply because the latter is beginning to supply oil,” said Mbiyo.

He added that Africa should really at this time concentrate on sustaining growth mainly because the continent continue to lags behind other major developing and developed economies.

Source: mediaclubsouthafrica.com,

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SA business gets tech-savvy

Smartphones have made a dramatic entry into corporate South Africa, far surpassing general consumer use or small business use.

This is a surprise finding from a new research study released today by World Wide Worx. The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 report reveals that three-quarters of South African companies have deployed smartphones in their organisations, compared to almost none two years ago.

The study, backed by First National Bank and Research In Motion (RIM), shows thaSmartphones have made a dramatic entry into corporate South Africa, far surpassing general consumer use or small business use.

This is a surprise finding from a new research study released today by World Wide Worx. The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 report reveals that three-quarters of South African companies have deployed smartphones in their organisations, compared to almost none two years ago.

The study, backed by First National Bank and Research In Motion (RIM), shows that saturation point has almost been reached by large South African companies in the use of fixed landlines (96%) and ordinary cellphones (92%). And, as forecast in 2007, 3G data card penetration has also reached near saturation, with 94% of large companies deploying it. Now the focus has turned to integration of smartphones with business processes.

“These results show that enterprise mobility solutions are no longer just nice to have,” says Deon Liebenberg, RIM’s regional director for sub-Saharan Africa. “They’re essential for businesses that want to be competitive, responsive and efficient in a world where a customer won’t wait for a salesperson who is visiting customers and where project flow can’t stop because a manager is at a full-day meeting.

“Not only does mobility allow companies to improve internal efficiencies and communications, it also enables them to interact more effectively with their increasingly mobile customers.”

The study also showed that corporate South Africa expects to embrace the new world of online services to an extent that was not even anticipated as recently as one year ago.

“Until last year, concepts like software as a service (Saas) and cloud computing were regarded as little more than buzzwords,” says Arthur Goldstuck, MD of World Wide Worx.

Yet, in the next 24 months, 84% of South African corporations expect to have a Saas strategy in place, and 60% expect to have adopted a cloud computing strategy.

“These aren’t technologies as such,” says Goldstuck. “They are strategies that make the organisation’s use of new technology more efficient. From storage systems to software deployment, from hardware upgrades to network capacity to bandwidth, the focus is on cost-effectiveness, flexibility and mobility.”

Among the technologies expected to take off as a result of the Saas and cloud computing revolution are:

* Fixed-mobile convergence, with 72% of companies expecting to adopt systems that allow seamless connectivity between fixed and mobile networks.
* Virtualisation, with 65% expected to embrace this flexible and cost-effective approach to network and server technology.
* Outsourced storage and archiving systems, with half of large South African companies predicting they will be using it in the next 24 months.

The combined effect of these technologies is that, while the organisation’s buildings and infrastructure may still be confined to a specific site, its people, activities, information, documentation and data have been freed from location.

“We are literally seeing the foundations being laid for the company of the future,” says Goldstuck.

Liebenberg adds: “Smartphones are now mainstream devices within South African businesses, but the smartphone revolution has only just begun. Enterprises should now be looking at what smartphones mean for their businesses in a more strategic and holistic fashion. They need to work towards mobilising their core internal and customer-facing processes so that their employees can use ubiquitous connectivity to be productive and responsive wherever they are.”

The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 forms part of the Mobility 2009 project, which included research among 1 000 consumers, 1 000 small and medium enterprisese and 240 large enterprises in South Africa.

Source: mediaclubsouthafrica.com, mobilemarketingwatch.com, apple.com, nokia,com, blackberry.com saturation point has almost been reached by large South African companies in the use of fixed landlines (96%) and ordinary cellphones (92%). And, as forecast in 2007, 3G data card penetration has also reached near saturation, with 94% of large companies deploying it. Now the focus has turned to integration of smartphones with business processes.

“These results show that enterprise mobility solutions are no longer just nice to have,” says Deon Liebenberg, RIM’s regional director for sub-Saharan Africa. “They’re essential for businesses that want to be competitive, responsive and efficient in a world where a customer won’t wait for a salesperson who is visiting customers and where project flow can’t stop because a manager is at a full-day meeting.

“Not only does mobility allow companies to improve internal efficiencies and communications, it also enables them to interact more effectively with their increasingly mobile customers.”

The study also showed that corporate South Africa expects to embrace the new world of online services to an extent that was not even anticipated as recently as one year ago.

“Until last year, concepts like software as a service (Saas) and cloud computing were regarded as little more than buzzwords,” says Arthur Goldstuck, MD of World Wide Worx.

Yet, in the next 24 months, 84% of South African corporations expect to have a Saas strategy in place, and 60% expect to have adopted a cloud computing strategy.

“These aren’t technologies as such,” says Goldstuck. “They are strategies that make the organisation’s use of new technology more efficient. From storage systems to software deployment, from hardware upgrades to network capacity to bandwidth, the focus is on cost-effectiveness, flexibility and mobility.”

Among the technologies expected to take off as a result of the Saas and cloud computing revolution are:

* Fixed-mobile convergence, with 72% of companies expecting to adopt systems that allow seamless connectivity between fixed and mobile networks.
* Virtualisation, with 65% expected to embrace this flexible and cost-effective approach to network and server technology.
* Outsourced storage and archiving systems, with half of large South African companies predicting they will be using it in the next 24 months.

The combined effect of these technologies is that, while the organisation’s buildings and infrastructure may still be confined to a specific site, its people, activities, information, documentation and data have been freed from location.


“We are literally seeing the foundations being laid for the company of the future,” says Goldstuck.

Liebenberg adds: “Smartphones are now mainstream devices within South African businesses, but the smartphone revolution has only just begun. Enterprises should now be looking at what smartphones mean for their businesses in a more strategic and holistic fashion. They need to work towards mobilising their core internal and customer-facing processes so that their employees can use ubiquitous connectivity to be productive and responsive wherever they are.”

The Mobile Corporation in South Africa 2010 forms part of the Mobility 2009 project, which included research among 1 000 consumers, 1 000 small and medium enterprisese and 240 large enterprises in South Africa.

Source: mediaclubsouthafrica.com, mobilemarketingwatch.com, apple.com, nokia,com, blackberry.com

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