South Africans conserve a huge amount of energy resources

South Africans currently have conserved 1 800 megawatts worth of electrical energy as a direct result of energy efficient equipment and lighting, reveals power parastatal Eskom.

Based on research by the parastatal, 43.5 million compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) have already been rolled out throughout the country as an integral part of Eskom’s National Efficient Lighting Programme between 2004 and 2010. As a result of this, South Africans have actually assisted to conserve a sufficient amount of electricity to power an urban area comparable to the size of Durban.

Eskom's Senior General Manager of Integrated Demand Management, Andrew Etzinger

Eskom’s Senior General Manager of Integrated Demand Management, Andrew Etzinger , reported the achievements of the programme is without a doubt as a result of the an incredible number of energy-conscious and environmentally-concerned South Africans.

Eskom is undoubtedly delighted as to what has actually been accomplished as a result of this particular programme. The electrical power saved as a consequence of the noticeable decrease in usage by lighting products in households and buildings throughout the country brings us that much closer to realising our energy savings goal, targets and objectives, he was quoted saying.


The 43.5 million CFLs in considered the highest quantity to be rolled out internationally in a single country by way of a single campaign. Mexico happens to be thinking about the roll out of 30 million CFLs, which will certainly position them second to South Africa.

Eskom, having said that, emphasised the difference between the supply and demand of electrical power will continue to be tight until such time as the first unit of the Medupi power plant commences to producing usable energy in 2012. The power station is located in Limpopo.


The parastatal continues to encourage all South Africans to continue to keep conserving electrical power.

The programme was introduced to be able to motivate and encourage the public to switch from incandescent bulbs to energy efficient CFLs (that happens to be miniature versions of full-sized tubular fluorescents and tend to be exceptionally energy efficient), consistent with international trends. CFLs consume up to 80 percent less electricity when compared to a conventional incandescent light bulb, at the same time rendering the equivalent amount of light.


These types of light bulbs have been given away free of charge to consumers throughout the country in exchange for incandescent bulbs.

The environmentally friendly light bulbs, which usually cost between R60 and R80 per bulb, have finally dropped in price, and are currently being sold on average at R15 per light bulb.


“Over the past six years, we appear to have overcome the most important barriers that previously discouraged the widespread utilization of CFLs. Considering that they happen to be more budget friendly, readily available and may also be applied in just about any setting that we would make use of a regular light bulb, the adoption of CFLs is certainly beginning to gather momentum in this country, as it is everywhere else across the world,” said Etzinger.

Source: BuaNews, awakeningcharlotte.com, realnovare.com, green.tmcnet.com, engineeringnews.co.za

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